Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2011

Publication Source

Classical World

Volume

104

Issue

3

Start Page

339

Last Page

353

DOI

10.1353/clw.2011.0049

Abstract

Since Nathaniel Hawthorne's pioneering A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls (1851) and Tanglewood Tales (1853), retelling Greek and Roman myths for children has been a widespread and influential means of popularizing classical material. While Hawthorne unabashedly appropriated the myths as entertainment for young readers, works by his contemporary counterparts (such as the "Myth-O-Mania" series,Greece! Rome! Monsters! , and the Percy Jackson series) display a more anxious and conflicted approach to the same material, caught between the aims of educating their readers about antiquity and appealing to their readers' presumed hostility to school and learning.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Copyright © 2011 Johns Hopkins University Press. This article first appeared in Classical World 104:3 (2011), 339-353. Reprinted with permission by Johns Hopkins University Press.

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Date Posted: 27 July 2016

This document has been peer reviewed.