Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Document Type

Book Chapter

Date of this Version

2010

Publication Source

Ancient Historiography and Its Contexts: Studies in Honour of A. J. Woodman

Start Page

353

Last Page

363

DOI

10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558681.001.0001

Abstract

This chapter is an investigation of a Tacitean metaphor for historiography and its implications for the historian's role in history. The metaphor of the historian's physical proximity to his subject matter, which is found in the Annals 4 digression contrasting Tacitus's work with that of historians of earlier periods, is an offshoot of the enargeia that often enlivens a narrative. It is also one of the many connections between this digression and both Tacitus's account of the trial of the historian Cremutius Cordus (4.34-35) and what he suggests about his own work as historian.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This material was originally published in Ancient Historiography and its Contexts: Studies in Honour of A. J. Woodman by / edited by Christina S. Kraus, John Marincola, and Christopher Pelling, and has been reproduced by permission of Oxford University Press http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558681.001.0001/acprof-9780199558681. For permission to reuse this material, please visit http://global.oup.com/academic/rights.

Keywords

Tacitus, Annals, digression, enargeia, Cremutius Cordus

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Date Posted: 03 March 2016

This document has been peer reviewed.