Departmental Papers (CIS)

Date of this Version

2010

Document Type

Journal Article

Comments

Mihayliv, S., Jacob, M., Ives, Z., & Guha, S., Dynamic Join Optimization in Multi-Hop Wireless Sensor Networks, Journal Article, 2010

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Abstract

To enable smart environments and self-tuning data centers, we are developing the Aspen system for integrating physical sensor data, as well as stream data coming from machine logical state, and database or Web data from the Internet. A key component of this system is a query processor optimized for limited-bandwidth, possibly battery-powered devices with multiple hop wireless radio communications. This query processor is given a portion of a data integration query, possibly including joins among sensors, to execute. Several recent papers have developed techniques for computing joins in sensors, but these techniques are static and are only appropriate for specific join selectivity ratios. We consider the problem of dynamic join optimization for sensor networks, developing solutions that employ cost modeling, as well as adaptive learning and self-tuning heuristics to choose the best algorithm under real and variable selectivity values. We focus on in-network join computation, but our architecture extends to other approaches (and we compare against these). We develop basic techniques assuming selectivities are uniform and known in advance, and optimization can be done on a pairwise basis; we then extend the work to handle joins between multiple pairs, when selectivities are not fully known. We experimentally validate our work at scale using standard datasets.

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Date Posted: 20 July 2012