Business Economics and Public Policy Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2014

Publication Source

Journal of Policy Analysis and Management

Volume

33

Issue

1

Start Page

70

Last Page

93

DOI

10.1002/pam.21731/abstract

Abstract

Emergency contraception (EC) can prevent pregnancy after sex, but only if taken within 72 hours of intercourse. Over the past 15 years, access to EC has been expanded at both the state and federal level. This paper studies the impact of those policies. We find that expanded access to EC has had no statistically significant effect on birth or abortion rates. Expansions of access, however, have changed the venue in which the drug is obtained, shifting its provision from hospital emergency departments to pharmacies. We find evidence that this shift may have led to a decrease in reports of sexual assault

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Gross, T., Lafortune, J. and Low, C. (2014), What Happens the Morning After? The Costs and Benefits of Expanding Access to Emergency Contraception. J. Pol. Anal. Manage., 33: 70–93. doi:10.1002/pam.21731, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pam.21731. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms

Embargo Date

11-1-2015

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.