Business Economics and Public Policy Papers

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

12-2008

Publication Source

Journal of Empirical Legal Studies

Volume

5

Issue

4

Start Page

853

Last Page

873

DOI

10.1111/j.1740-1461.2008.00143.x

Abstract

Divorce law changes made in the 1970s affected marital formation, dissolution, and bargaining within marriage. By altering the terms of the marital contract, these legal changes impacted the incentives for women to enter and remain in the labor force. Whereas earlier work suggests that the impact of unilateral divorce on female employment depends critically on laws governing property division, I show that these results are not robust to alternative specifications and controls. I find, instead, that unilateral divorce led to an increase in both married and unmarried female labor force participation, regardless of the preexisting laws regarding property division.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Stevenson, Betsey “Divorce-Law and Women’s Labor Supply,” Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, December 2008, 5 (4): 853-873, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1740-1461.2008.00143.x/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving [link to http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms].

Keywords

marriage, divorce, household allocation, female labor force participation

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Date Posted: 27 November 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.