Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

6-2004

Publication Source

Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies

Volume

1

Issue

2

Start Page

127

Last Page

150

DOI

10.1080/14791420410001685359

Abstract

The congregational crowd was a powerful mode of political communication in the nineteenth-century US until banished by the imposition of literate modes on popular electoral politics by Progressive reformers. We examine its major channels of expression, bodily mass communication and public sensationalism, within a framework of class-based struggle, observing that the practice of live bodily assembly created broad points of entry into political life, socialized the young, and successfully conveyed the importance of voting. A text-based normative model of the informed deliberative voter, we argue, offers too narrow a conception of participation compared to a more spaciously conceived democratic community.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies on June 2004, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14791420410001685359

Keywords

democracy, civic participation, bodily communication, class struggle, public assembly, voting

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Date Posted:01 April 2019