Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

12-2018

Publication Source

Current Opinion in Psychology

Volume

24

Start Page

53

Last Page

57

DOI

10.1016/j.copsyc.2018.05.004

Abstract

What makes people successful at influencing others? In this review, we focus on the role of the persuader (i.e., person who attempts to influence a recipient), drawing from findings in neuroscience to highlight key drivers that contribute to persuaders’ decisions to share information, and variables that distinguish successful persuaders from those who are less successful. We review evidence that people's motivations to share are guided in the brain by value-based decision making, with self-relevance and social-relevance as two key motivational inputs to the value computation. We then argue that persuaders who exhibit higher awareness of social considerations and increased recruitment of the brain's mentalizing system are more successful. We conclude by suggesting that approaches integrating social and neural networks can productively advance knowledge in this field.

Copyright/Permission Statement

Originally published in Current Opinion in Psychology © 2018 Elsevier.

This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/. The final version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2018.05.004

Embargo Date

1-1-2020

Available for download on Wednesday, January 01, 2020

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Date Posted: 19 June 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.