Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

2014

Publication Source

Curator: The Museum Journal

Volume

57

Issue

2

Start Page

153

Last Page

171

DOI

10.1111/cura.12058

Abstract

First Nations women were instrumental to the collection of Northwest Coast Indigenous culture, yet their voices are nearly invisible in the published record. The contributions of George Hunt, the Tlingit/British culture broker who collaborated with anthropologist Franz Boas, overshadow the intellectual influence of his mother, Anislaga Mary Ebbetts, his sisters, and particularly his Kwakwaka'wakw wives, Lucy Homikanis and Tsukwani Francine. In his correspondence with Boas, Hunt admitted his dependence upon high-status Indigenous women, and he gave his female relatives visual prominence in film, photographs, and staged performances, but their voices are largely absent from anthropological texts. Hunt faced many unexpected challenges (disease, death, arrest, financial hardship, and the suspicions of his neighbors), yet he consistently placed Boas' demands, perspectives, and editorial choices foremost. The resulting cultural representations marginalized the influence of the First Nations women who had been integral to their creation.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the non-published version of this publication, the VOR is available through Wiley Online Library.

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Date Posted: 01 March 2018

This document has been peer reviewed.