Theses (Historic Preservation)

Document Type

Thesis or dissertation

Date of this Version

2014

Comments

Suggested Citation:

Bates, Lindsay (2014). Bombing, Tagging, Writing: An Analysis of the Significance of Graffiti and Street Art. (Masters Thesis). University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

A first look upon a well-contrived piece of graffiti or street art may inspire feelings of surprise, delight, and amusement, but the connection between graffiti and cultural heritage might be more difficult to perceive. Conventionally, graffiti was synonymous with vandalism, associated with a subculture that needed to be extinguished immediately. However, with the works of such artists as Basquiat, Keith Haring, Banksy, Steve Powers, and the like, graffiti began to be recognized as something more than crime – something with far more value, something that could reach beyond the walls of a gallery. Indeed, this subculture has since proliferated exponentially, and with its popularity a closer connection to heritage becomes more apparent. Though it may be a more radical and alternative way of creating heritage, its increasing recognition suggests that such cultural values are clearly demonstrated.

Keywords

public art, Steve Powers, 5Pointz, Mural Arts Program, Rice Mill Lofts

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Date Posted: 03 September 2014