GSE Publications

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

3-2005

Publication Source

Language Policy

Volume

4

Issue

1

Start Page

87

Last Page

106

DOI

10.1007/s10993-004-6566-2

Abstract

For more than three decades U.S. language education policy was realized through the Bilingual Education Act (BEA), enacted in 1968 to meet the educational needs of language minority students. The BEA emphasized bilingual education and provided options for the development of students’ native language as well as their English language proficiency and academic achievement. In 2002 the BEA was replaced with the English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement Act. Current policy implicitly repeals the BEA and emphasizes the need for schools to quickly develop students' English language proficiency and move them to English only classrooms. Drawing on Ricento and Hornberger's (1996) "onion metaphor" for the multi-layered nature of language planning and policy, this paper considers the potential impact changes in language education policy may have on programs and practices for language minority students. A summary of interview responses from a small sample of Southern Oregon educators adds an on the ground perspective.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10993-004-6566-2

Keywords

No Child Left Behind, bilingual education, language planning orientation, scientifically based research, onion metaphor, teachers’ understandings, language minority education

 

Date Posted: 20 November 2015