Goldstone Research Unit

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

4-2010

Publication Source

Journal of Behavioral Decision Making

Volume

23

Issue

2

Start Page

161

Last Page

178

DOI

10.1002/bdm.648

Abstract

What is considered to be fair depends on context-dependent expectations. Using a modified version of the Ultimatum Game, we demonstrate that both fair behavior and perceptions of fairness depend upon beliefs about what one ought to do in a situation—that is, upon normative expectations. We manipulate such expectations by creating informational asymmetries about the offer choices available to the Proposer, and find that behavior varies accordingly. Proposers and Responders show a remarkable degree of agreement in their beliefs about which choices are considered fair. We discuss how these results fit into a theory of social norms.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the article which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.648. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

Keywords

game theory, fairness, social norms, normative expectations

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Date Posted: 18 December 2014

This document has been peer reviewed.