Date of Award

Winter 2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Social Work (DSW)

First Advisor

Andrea Doyle, Ph.D

Second Advisor

Frances Rust, Ed.D.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

TEACHER ANXIETY: STUDY OF EFFECTIVENESS OF MINDFULNESS THERAPY (MT) INTERVENTION FOR ANXIETY REDUCTION

James K. Joseph, LCSW, M.S.Ed.

Andrea Doyle, Ph.D.

A teacher’s inability to successfully manage stress can lead to low job satisfaction rates, burnout, poor interpersonal relationships, reduced feelings of self-efficacy, reduced immune function, and emotional distress (Cohen, Miller, & Rabin, 2001; Roeser et al., 2013; Travers & Cooper, 1993). Harry Stack Sullivan (1953) identifies these conditions as sources of anxiety. They also serve to detract from the academic and social experience of the students (Darr & Johns, 2008; Roeser, Skinner, Beers, & Jennings, 2012). Research based, cost-effective interventions, such as mindfulness therapy (MT) (e.g. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), could serve to help teachers reduce their anxiety through the improvement of their anxiety management skills. This research proposes a comparative intervention study to determine whether a 4 week MBSR intervention presented “in-vivo” is more effective at helping teachers improve their anxiety management skills than a self-guided on-line presentation of the intervention. The research proposal seeks to determine if there is an inverse correlation between improved executive functioning as measured by the Berkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS) and anxiety as measured by the Burns Anxiety Inventory (BAI). This dissertation is comprised of three parts: Review of the Literature, Research Proposal, and the Website Developed for the intervention.

Included in

Social Work Commons

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