Construct validation of the Learning Behaviors Scale by independent measures of student performance

Helen S Hamlet, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Overt academic behaviors, such as problem solving strategies, attention skills, and motivation, are key, instructional targets considered to contribute both to present and future progress (Barnett, 1996; McKinney, 1975). The assessment of student behaviors through the use of behavior rating scales is prevalent in the field of education. With the link between learning behaviors and achievement and the widespread use of behavior ratings scales, the need for valid, standardized rating scales that focus on observable and potentially alterable learning behaviors is evident. One such measure is the Learning Behaviors Scale (LBS; McDermott, Green, Francis, & Stott, 1999). In light of the LBS, the present study explored the constructs of attention, problem solving, and motivation with the following tasks used as standards for comparison: the Attention/Persistence subscale of the LBS with the Trail Making Test (TMT; Reitan & Wolfson, 1985); the Attention/Persistence subscale of the LBS with the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III; Wechsler, 1991); the Strategy/Flexibility subscale of the LBS with the Mazes of the WISC-III (Wechsler, 1991); the Strategy/Flexibility subscale of the LBS with the Matrices subtest of the Differential Abilities Scale (Elliott, 1990); the Motivation subscale of the LBS with the General subscale of the Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (Gottfried, 1985). Teachers rated student learning behaviors with the 29-item LBS. Teacher-assigned grades and standardized achievement scores served as achievement criterions. The participant sample (N = 141) consisted of students from two schools in southeastern Pennsylvania. Although the results failed to support the proposed hypotheses, a number of factors influenced the study: a contextual impact on the execution of the TMT, the construct validity of intelligence scale subtests, and variance due to the different sources of information gathered in this study. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Educational Psychology|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

Helen S Hamlet, "Construct validation of the Learning Behaviors Scale by independent measures of student performance" (January 1, 1999). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI9937730.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9937730

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