A study of organizational culture and its effect on the scholarly productivity of African -American women nurse faculty at predominantly White and historically Black colleges and universities

Gloria J McNeal, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

The scholarly contributions of African American women nurse faculty remain largely unknown within the halls of academe. Organizational culture formed the theoretical basis for this investigation. The primary purposes of this study were: (1) to examine the relationships among factors associated with organizational culture and the scholarly productivity of African American women nurse faculty teaching at historically black (HBCUs) and predominantly white colleges and universities (PWCUs); (2) to compare the differences in African American women nurse faculty productivity at HBCUs and PWCUs; and, (3) to correlate faculty satisfaction with levels of productivity. Data were collected using a two-part survey, mailed to the campus addresses of 467 African American women nurse faculty. A 31.5 percent response rate (N = 147) was achieved. Thirty states and the District of Columbia were represented among the respondents. A variety of scales using multiple statistical techniques were employed to analyze the data sets. The aggregated data findings of this study did not support a strong relationship between selected elements of organizational culture and the scholarly productivity of African American women nurse faculty teaching at HBCUs and PWCUs. However, when the data were disaggregated by type school, weak to moderately significant differences between HBCU and PWCU faculty were noted for 8 of the 10 faculty/institutional variables, and for several components of the satisfaction survey. In general, while PWCU faculty demonstrated higher levels of productivity when compared with HBCU faculty, PWCU respondents tended to be less satisfied with the leadership, mission, environment, and socialization process of their respective academic institutions. Comparatively, HBCU faculty tended to be less satisfied with the availability of informational resources. These findings suggest that productivity, among African American women nurse faculty, may be more closely associated with institutional resources, than with sociocultural environmental factors. These findings have practical, political and research implications. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Education, Sociology of|Health Sciences, Education|Education, Administration|Health Sciences, Nursing|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Gloria J McNeal, "A study of organizational culture and its effect on the scholarly productivity of African -American women nurse faculty at predominantly White and historically Black colleges and universities" (January 1, 1998). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI9840218.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9840218

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