Selecting the appropriate health plan: What employers should know about employee values, perceptions and choice behaviors

David Kasiarz, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Much criticism has been directed toward the U.S. health care system. Issues ranging from uncontrollable costs, poor quality, and increasing numbers of uninsured have led to calls for governmental intervention. Concerns about intervention have caused the private sector to explore new ways of improving health care delivery.^ The current investigation is a first step in understanding and better matching employee needs with employer-sponsored programs. A review of items important to employees' choice of health plans, their impact on actual selection and disenrollment was conducted using employees from a large Consumer Products company. Data was collected (via a mail survey) during the 1996 benefits enrollment season.^ The major findings suggested that: (1) employee plan selection is primarily determined by health status (lower health equals more predictable selections); (2) employees don't always maximize their selections by changing plans, particularly if they are already in poor health; (3) plan changes are due to dissatisfaction, rather than new plan advantages.^ The implications of the above suggest that much more work is needed to ensure that employers understand and improve the delivery of quality health care. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management|Psychology, Industrial|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies|Sociology, Industrial and Labor Relations|Sociology, Public and Social Welfare

Recommended Citation

David Kasiarz, "Selecting the appropriate health plan: What employers should know about employee values, perceptions and choice behaviors" (January 1, 1997). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI9814869.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9814869

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