The history of Mexican folk foodways of South Texas: Street vendors, offal foods, and {\it barbacoa de cabeza\/}

Mario Montano, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This dissertation is a historical and ethnographic account of the Mexican folk foodways in the Lower Rio Grande Border Region in South Texas. It provides a historical description of the origin and diffusion of the different kinds of foods and their preparation, tracing some of them to the Prehispanic period. Then, it focuses on the settlement of Nuevo Santander, the area that covered South Texas and Tamualipas. Next, an oral history account of those folk foods prepared by Mexican food vendors is presented. Also, it traces the origin of several folk foods and analyzes their appropriation by the dominant culture. Finally, it looks at barbacoa de cabeza (beef head barbecue) as a folk food that has resisted appropriation, providing an historical account of the word and the preparation process in a small South Texas border town. Overall, this dissertation addresses the hidden meanings encoded in the folk foods of the Lower Rio Grande Border Region. ^

Subject Area

Anthropology, Cultural|Folklore|Agriculture, Food Science and Technology

Recommended Citation

Mario Montano, "The history of Mexican folk foodways of South Texas: Street vendors, offal foods, and {\it barbacoa de cabeza\/}" (January 1, 1992). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI9308630.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI9308630

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