VOLUNTARY STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS: A CASE STUDY OF PHILADELPHIA TEACHERS' LEARNING COOPERATIVE (TLC) (PENNSYLVANIA)

MINORU SAKAMOTO, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

The purpose of this research as a descriptive case study is to explore the voluntary staff development programs present in the Philadelphia Teachers' Learning Cooperative (TLC). Although there now exists established research in ineffective and effective staff development programs, there is little literature that researches the area of voluntary staff development programs deal mainly with what an individual teacher does for his/her professional growth rather than leadership, personal change, rational planning, and many intervention strategies for a whole faculty or district-mandated effort.^ TLC is unique because it has no officers or executives and it does not rely on public funds. TLC has developed and run its own voluntary staff development programs since 1978.^ The methodology used for the study was that of participant observer. Data were collected during April through July 1986. Data source included recorded observations of the TLC weekly sessions, questionnaires, and interviews of the TLC participants.^ The study: (A) Focuses on what happens in the TLC weekly sessions which have been developed and run by teachers/educators. (B) Describes the TLC session as a voluntary staff development program. (C) Describes the nature of the TLC historical and philosophical background and its activities. (D) Offers concrete recommendations that encourage TLC as a professional support group of teachers/educators.^ A review of the recorded events and activities substantiates the following findings: (1) The weekly TLC sessions help the participants to deepen their understanding and awareness of teaching as professional activities. (2) The TLC participants respect the rights of others, empathize with others, and work together. (3) The TLC participants attempt to support their own values independently without reference to external values, goals, and expectations. (4) TLC provides continuous mutual support in integrating various educational ideas. (5) The TLC participants regularly have the opportunity to discuss their philosophy of education with others, and to rethink assumptions about child development, learning, and the role of teachers in school organization and society. ^

Subject Area

Education, Teacher Training

Recommended Citation

MINORU SAKAMOTO, "VOLUNTARY STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS: A CASE STUDY OF PHILADELPHIA TEACHERS' LEARNING COOPERATIVE (TLC) (PENNSYLVANIA)" (January 1, 1986). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI8714937.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8714937

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