UNITED STATES-PUERTO RICO RELATIONS IN THE EARLY COLD WAR YEARS (1945-1953)

CARLOS RAMON ZAPATA-OLIVERAS, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Puerto Rico's Commonwealth status is surrounded with much controversy. Some contend that the island is still an American colony, others argue that this is not the case. It was during the Truman administration that that peculiar political formula was adopted. This dissertation analyzes its establishment in 1952.^ Chapter I and II study United States' colonial policy in the post-war years, and United States-Puerto Rico relations from 1898 (when the island became an American possession) until 1945. Chapter III analyzes the factors that precipitated the need to search for a solution to Puerto Rico's colonial condition after 1945, the different alternatives advocated, the difficulties for implementing them, and why the Commonwealth was finally chosen. The measures taken to facilitate the implementation of the Commonwealth are examined in Chapter IV. Chapter V analyzes the establishment of this political alternative, and chapter VI the successful removal of Puerto Rico from the United Nations list of colonial territories in 1953.^ Two conclusions are reached. First, that although Puerto Rico is not a full-fledged colony, it still possesses colonial traits, traits that make the Commonwealth status unsatisfactory. Second, that given the island's precarious economic situation and the fact that the main concern of the insular administration was to improve that situation, no political option other than the Commonwealth was available between 1945 and 1953. ^

Subject Area

History, United States

Recommended Citation

CARLOS RAMON ZAPATA-OLIVERAS, "UNITED STATES-PUERTO RICO RELATIONS IN THE EARLY COLD WAR YEARS (1945-1953)" (January 1, 1986). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI8624041.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8624041

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