EFFECTIVENESS OF THE RANDOM DOT E STEREOTEST COMPARED TO THE SNELLEN ILLITERATE E AND COVER TEST IN PRESCHOOL VISION SCREENING (PENNSYLVANIA, AMBLYOPIA, MODIFIED CLINICAL TECHNIQUE)

RONALD VINCENT PETRILLA, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Certain visual dysfunctions such as amblyopia (lazy eye) and strabismus (crossed-eyes) must be detected and successfully treated before the age of six years in order to prevent irreparable sight loss. Despite vision screening programs, at most, only about 21 percent of preschool children are tested for these major vision problems. Of those who are screened, many are underreferred due to inadequate procedures and instruments.^ One hundred ten preschoolers aged 36 to 70 months were screened with the Random Dot E stereotest and the more traditional Snellen/cover test techniques. Half of the children were screened using the RDE first, followed by the Snellen Illiterate E acuity test and a cover test. The remaining children were screened with each method in reverse order. Within several days, each child was screened by an optometrist using the Modified Clinical Technique to determine correct referrals, overreferrals, and underreferrals generated by each procedure.^ The RDE stereotest correctly identified each of the eleven children who were to be referred as indicated by the Modified Clinical Technique. The RDE overreferred three children with no underreferrals, and all subjects agreed to participate in the screening. The Snellen/cover test combination correctly referred four children, while overreferring four and underreferring seven. Ten preschoolers refused to cooperate and were recorded as unable to be screened with the traditional screening technique.^ The present study supports recent research which indicates that the RDE compares with the Modified Clinical Technique in effectiveness. Implications regarding the Random Dot E stereotest's use in preschool vision screening programs is discussed. The researcher concludes that the RDE seems to be an age-appropriate instrument, indicating that it could be included in the preschool vision screening battery. The author recommends further research in order to determine if the Random Dot E consistently performs superior to more conventional techniques such as the Snellen Illiterate E and cover test. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

RONALD VINCENT PETRILLA, "EFFECTIVENESS OF THE RANDOM DOT E STEREOTEST COMPARED TO THE SNELLEN ILLITERATE E AND COVER TEST IN PRESCHOOL VISION SCREENING (PENNSYLVANIA, AMBLYOPIA, MODIFIED CLINICAL TECHNIQUE)" (January 1, 1985). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI8515436.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8515436

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