DRIVER EDUCATION FOR EDUCABLE AND TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED STUDENTS IN CHESTER COUNTY: STATUS AND CONFORMANCE TO SELECTED REFERENCE STANDARDS (PENNSYLVANIA)

ALAN GREGORY ELKO, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

While the research indicates that the mentally retarded can successfully be taught to drive, there is little reported evidence regarding the availability, extent and type of participation of the mentally retarded in school driver education programs.^ The present study has examined the status of driver education for mentally retarded students. The availability, extent and type of program participation has been examined in Chester County, Pennsylvania.^ In addition, the present study examined whether these programs have met selected reference standards. These reference standards included legal and regulatory standards, program resources and performance levels of nonexceptional students and the opinions of select interest groups.^ Specific questions that have been answered in this study are: (1) What are the program resources and performance levels of mentally retarded and non-exceptional students in driver education? (2) What legal and regulatory standards exist in driver education for mentally retarded students? (3) What do select interest groups believe should exist for the mentally retarded in driver education? (4) What differences exist between driver education services for the mentally retarded and those selected reference standards?^ Answers to these questions were obtained through records analysis and structured interviews in the spring and summer of 1982. Interviews were conducted with a sample of mentally retarded students, their parents, special education teachers, driver education teachers and college professors of safety education.^ Major findings of the study included: (1) Few mentally retarded students participated in driver education. For those students who participated, instruction was primarily the same as that offered to non-exceptional peers. (2) There are several legal and regulatory standards which have implications for driver education for the mentally retarded. There are several differences between these standards and current practices. (3) There are large differences between the percentage of non-exceptional and mentally retarded students who participated in driver education. (4) Driver education teachers, special education teachers, parents and college professors of safety education have similar views regarding what should exist in driver education for the mentally retarded. Their opinions differ in several areas from what currently exists in driver education for the mentally retarded.^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

ALAN GREGORY ELKO, "DRIVER EDUCATION FOR EDUCABLE AND TRAINABLE MENTALLY RETARDED STUDENTS IN CHESTER COUNTY: STATUS AND CONFORMANCE TO SELECTED REFERENCE STANDARDS (PENNSYLVANIA)" (January 1, 1983). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI8318159.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8318159

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