DRIVER EDUCATION FOR LEARNING DISABLED AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED STUDENTS IN CHESTER COUNTY: STATUS OF AND CONFORMANCE TO SELECTED REFERENCE STANDARDS (PENNSYLVANIA)

JAMES FRANCIS BOLOGA, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the status of driver education for Learning Disabled and Physically Handicapped students in Chester County and to determine to what degree these programs meet selected reference standards.^ Interviews were conducted of a sample of students, driver education teachers, special education teachers, parents of Learning Disabled and Physically Handicapped students and college professors of safety education. Also, official records and reports in driver education were analyzed.^ Official reports indicate that twenty-two percent of the Learning Disabled and seventeen percent of the Physically Handicapped have completed a standardized program in driver education as compared to fifty-eight percent of the non-exceptional students. The majority of students were found to receive classroom theory in large group classes with only nineteen percent of the Learning Disabled and Physically Handicapped students receiving instruction in small classes.^ The majority of respondents felt that Learning Disabled and Physically Handicapped students can be taught to drive. These groups also indicate that the most desirable way of teaching classroom theory should be small group instruction, team teaching and individualized instruction when needed. A combination of driver simulation and practice driving was selected as the most favorable methods of teaching the laboratory phase of driver education. The majority of respondents within each group indicated the need for additional instructional time in classroom theory and practice driving.^ Only half of the driver education teachers in the county reported that they had sufficient training and adequate understanding of Learning Disabled and Physically Handicapped students to teach them to drive.^ Differences were found between current practices and legal standards in driver education. All schools provide the standardized program in driver education. The majority of classroom instruction occurs in large groups which places severe restraints on meeting individual needs of exceptional students. The instructional time for classroom theory appears to be the same for exceptional as it is for the non-exceptional student. The largest difference appears to be in program availability with ninety-one percent of the non-exceptional students reported to have completed classroom theory as compared to twenty-two percent of the Learning Disabled and seventeen percent of the Physically Handicapped students completing classroom theory. ^

Subject Area

Education, Administration

Recommended Citation

JAMES FRANCIS BOLOGA, "DRIVER EDUCATION FOR LEARNING DISABLED AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED STUDENTS IN CHESTER COUNTY: STATUS OF AND CONFORMANCE TO SELECTED REFERENCE STANDARDS (PENNSYLVANIA)" (January 1, 1983). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI8318153.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI8318153

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