Nursing and allied health professionals' job satisfaction and intention to remain in their jobs

William Thygeson, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Rapid and dramatic change characterized the healthcare system in the Philadelphia region during the last decade of the 20th and beginning of the 21st centuries. Advances in technology and medicine have reduced length of stay in hospitals. Additionally, external forces have had an equal or greater impact on the healthcare system, specifically the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the rise of managed care in the region. In that context, this study assesses the level of job satisfaction of nursing and selected allied health professionals, their intent to seek new employment settings, their perception of positive and negative changes in the healthcare system, and their recommendations for curricular change to assist entry-level healthcare professionals to deliver high quality care in a rapidly changing environment. Survey results indicated that despite significant negative changes in the healthcare system, the level of job satisfaction is high for the professions represented. The best predictors of job satisfaction are "feeling of worthwhile accomplishment," "work load" and "recognition." Focus groups recommended that student clinical experiences should more closely resemble actual patient loads and that curricula should emphasize a multidisciplinary team approach to patient care.^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Education|Health Sciences, Nursing|Psychology, Industrial|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

William Thygeson, "Nursing and allied health professionals' job satisfaction and intention to remain in their jobs" (January 1, 2006). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI3225556.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3225556

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