Responses to unfamiliar pedagogical practices: Revelations about school culture and pedagogical difference

Alison Shira Klugherz Kideckel, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This study examined how the students, parents, teachers, and administrators responded to a teacher using unfamiliar and unconventional pedagogical practices in a high achieving, suburban high school. This study also examined the perspective of the teacher who used the unfamiliar pedagogy. The questions guiding this study are grounded in the literature on how individuals responded to pedagogical difference as well as on how the culture of the school influenced these responses. During the 2001–2002 school year, various qualitative data, including interviews, student journals, and field notes, were collected. Interviews were conducted with the principal, the mathematics supervisor, three teachers, and 10 students and their parents. Indifference to unfamiliar pedagogy was the primary response from the members of the school community. Grades, rather than pedagogy, were their central concern. The stability of the school and the regularity of complacency among the members of the school community served as the driving force against change. It is proposed that in order for pedagogical difference to stimulate pedagogical change a need for change in a school must be identified and a desire to initiate change must exist. ^

Subject Area

Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Alison Shira Klugherz Kideckel, "Responses to unfamiliar pedagogical practices: Revelations about school culture and pedagogical difference" (January 1, 2004). Dissertations available from ProQuest. Paper AAI3152066.
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3152066

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