CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Dimensions of Erewhon: The Modern Orpheus in Guy Davenport's "The Dawn in Erewhon"

Patrick Dillon

Division: Humanities

Dept/Program: English

Document Type: Undergraduate Student Research

Mentor(s): Charles Bernstein

Date of this Version: 10 December 2007

This document has been peer reviewed.

 

Revised version, posted 10 December 2007.

Abstract

In "The Dawn in Erewhon", the concluding novella of Tatlin!, Guy Davenport explores the myth of Orpheus in the context of two storylines: Adriaan van Hovendaal, a thinly veiled version of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and an updated retelling of Samuel Butler's utopian novel Erewhon. Davenport tells the story in a disjunctive style and uses the Orpheus myth as a symbol to refer to a creative sensibility that has been lost in modern technological civilization but is recoverable through art.

Suggested Citation

Dillon, Patrick, "Dimensions of Erewhon: The Modern Orpheus in Guy Davenport's "The Dawn in Erewhon"" 10 December 2007. CUREJ: College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal, University of Pennsylvania, http://repository.upenn.edu/curej/23.

Date Posted: 28 June 2006

This document has been peer reviewed.

 

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