Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

6-1-2001

Publication Source

Qualitative Sociology

Volume

24

Issue

2

Start Page

203

Last Page

220

DOI

10.1023/A:1010722225840

Abstract

This article contemplates the journalistic coverage of American espionage as an attempt to maintain consonance with broader cultural discourses about what it means to be an American. Tracking the American press coverage of the Jonathan Pollard spy case, the article demonstrates that the press turns espionage into a phenomenon upholding fundamental American beliefs in openness, sincerity, and straightforwardness. It shows that, rather than represent espionage as a phenomenon embodying deceit, secrecy, and immoral action, the press turns espionage into a phenomenon that communicates that one is what one says one is and that one's self presentation reflects one's insides. Ultimately, however, this representation of espionage undermines a full understanding of how - and why - spying works in culture.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com

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Date Posted: 04 March 2008

This document has been peer reviewed.