Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-1-2005

Publication Source

The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics

Volume

10

Issue

3

Start Page

26

Last Page

55

DOI

10.1177/1081180X05278370

Abstract

This article addresses the formulaic dependence of the news media on images of people facing impending death. Considering one example of this depiction — U.S. journalism's photographic coverage of the killing of the Taliban by the Northern Alliance during the war on Afghanistan, the article traces its strategic appearance and recycling across the U.S. news media and shows how the beatings and deaths of the Taliban were depicted in ways that fell short of journalism's proclaimed objective of fully documenting the events of the war. The article argues that in so doing, U.S. journalism failed to raise certain questions about the nature of the alliance between the United States and its allies on Afghanistan's northern front.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, Vol 10/Issue 3, 2005, © SAGE Publications, Inc., 2005, by SAGE Publications, Inc. at the The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics page: http://hij.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

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Date Posted: 04 March 2008

This document has been peer reviewed.