Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

9-18-2006

Publication Source

Endeavour

Volume

30

Issue

3

Start Page

84

Last Page

89

DOI

10.1016/j.endeavour.2006.09.001

Abstract

From 1816 onwards, London theatres began to install gas-lighting systems to replace candles. In addition to allowing theatre managers to adjust the level of illumination, gas lights offered greater brightness and visibility for the audience. Actors had to adjust to this new level of exposure that threatened their ability to ‘look the part.’ Until this illuminating moment, there had been little need for makeup and actors to adhere to the principles of physiognomy – a system that correlated character traits to facial features. Under the new harsh glare of the gas lights, both the faces of the actors and the theatres themselves were found wanting

Copyright/Permission Statement

©. (2006) This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

www.sciencedirect.com 0160-9327/$ – see front matter ©. 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.endeavour.2006.09.001

Comments

Note: At the time of publication, author Sharrona Pearl was affiliated with Harvard University, Department of History and Science. Currently, she is a faculty member at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Date Posted: 27 March 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.