Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

6-29-2009

Publication Source

History of Photography

Volume

33

Issue

3

Start Page

288

Last Page

305

DOI

10.1080/03087290902752978

Abstract

This article explores the photographic physiognomy of Victorian asylum superintendent Hugh Welch Diamond. Through close readings of Diamond’s photographs as well as commentary published by Diamond and Dr John Conolly, the author argues that Diamond expanded the meaning of the word physiognomy to include metonymic traits such as clothing and hairstyle. Diamond used physiognomy for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, and he staged his photographs to maximize their efficacy for both, creating a mediated mirror through which his patients viewed themselves. Through photographic physiognomy, Diamond tried to change the nature of asylum practice, using images of his patients to nurture them to health without physical restraints.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in History of Photography on 29 Jun 2009, available online: [http://wwww.tandfonline.com/ ] http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03087290902752978.

Keywords

Johan Caspar Lavater (1741–1801), HughWelch Diamond (1809–1886), John Conolly (1794–1866), Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893), physiognomy, photography, non-restraint, asylums, Victorian England

Included in

Communication Commons

Share

COinS
 

Date Posted: 27 March 2017

This document has been peer reviewed.