Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

11-1962

Publication Source

American Journal of Sociology

Volume

68

Issue

3

Start Page

371

Last Page

372

Abstract

Certain sociological problems are less likely than others to be studied through primary field research. Some deal with topics that do not seem important enough to warrant the expense of a full-scale field inquiry; others treat subjects about which most people believe the facts are known; some involve events and opinions in the past which cannot be measured among current populations. Under these and other circumstances a partial solution to the problem is sometimes provided by secondary analysis-the re-examination of data that were collected for another purpose in order to illuminate a new problem and test new hypotheses. The Joiners presents an excellent example of the kind of problem that sociologists can explore profitably through secondary analysis of past public opinion polls and social surveys.

Comments

At the time of publication, author Charles R. Wright was affiliated with the University of California Los Angeles. Currently, he is a faculty member at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Date Posted: 25 October 2016

This document has been peer reviewed.