Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

10-2013

Publication Source

Critical Studies in Media Communication

Volume

30

Issue

4

Start Page

307

Last Page

326

DOI

10.1080/15295036.2012.705436

Abstract

The postwar 1940s witnessed the beginnings of a full-fledged broadcast reform movement composed of labor activists, African Americans, disaffected intellectuals, Progressives, educators, and religious organizations. Although this reform movement would never realize the full sum of its parts before it was quelled by reactionary forces, it would succeed in registering significant victories as well as laying the necessary groundwork for future reform. The following analysis draws from archival materials and interviews to recover a largely forgotten moment in broadcast history, one that holds much contemporary relevance for current media reform efforts and media policy issues.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Studies in Media Communication on 2013, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15295036.2012.705436

Keywords

Media Reform; Media History; Broadcast Policy; Radio Studies; Social Movements

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Date Posted: 21 October 2015

This document has been peer reviewed.