Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

5-1-2004

Publication Source

American Behavioral Scientist

Volume

47

Issue

9

Start Page

1208

Last Page

1230

DOI

10.1177/0002764203262344

Abstract

This article argues that by providing virtually unlimited sources of political information, the new media environment undermines the idea that there are discrete gates through which political information passes: If there are no gates, there can be no gatekeepers. The difficulty of elites (political and media both) and academics in understanding the Lewinsky scandal stems from their failure to recognize the increasingly limited ability of journalists to act as gatekeepers. The disjuncture between elite attempts to both control and understand the scandal on one hand and the conclusions the public drew about this political spectacle on other hand speaks to some fundamental changes that have occurred in the role of the press in American society in the late 20th century.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, The American Behavioral Scientist, vol 47, no. 9, 2004, © SAGE Publications, Inc. at The American Behavioral Scientist page: http://abs.sagepub.com/ On SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

Keywords

gatekeeping, political scandal, Clinton-Lewinsky, new media

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Date Posted: 21 November 2013