Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1999

Publication Source

Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly

Volume

76

Issue

3

Start Page

485

Last Page

498

DOI

10.1177/107769909907600306

Abstract

Since the official end of the war in 1990, Lebanese news media have been affected by several regulatory, political, and economic factors. This article analyzes state attempts to control television news and political programs in postwar Lebanon. Internal factors motivating control include media regulation and political struggles between the regime and its opponents, and between government branches. External factors include the strategic position of Lebanon's media in the Arab world, Lebanon's political and economic dependence on some Arab regimes, and the advent of pan-Arab satellite broadcasting. Direct and indirect forms of control are discussed.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, vol. 76 no. 3, 1999, © SAGE Publications, Inc., 1999 at the Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly page: http://jmq.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

Comments

NOTE: At the time of publication, author Marwan Kraidy was affiliated with the University of North Dakota. Currently (March 2013), he is a faculty member at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Date Posted: 29 March 2013