Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

8-1999

Publication Source

Management Communication Quarterly

Volume

13

Issue

1

Start Page

135

Last Page

145

DOI

10.1177/0893318999131007

Abstract

Much has happened since the 1960s and 1970s when the idea of self-organization emerged and began to alter our conceptions of human nature, of social organization, and of a social science that had heretofore been wedded to linear causal explanations. The experience that systems could organize themselves has been revolutionary and constitutes a paradigm shift that is still ongoing. In the following, I will (A) distinguish between indigenously and self-organizing systems, (B) consider autopoiesis as a biological step towards selfhood, (C) propose a way to distinguish selves and Others, and, based on this, (D) suggest self-organization to be a social phenomenon. As the notion of self-organization reconceptualizes social organization and human experience, I will close with (E), suggestions for further work on self-organization.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Management Communication Quarterly. Vol. 13(1), 1999, © SAGE Publications, Inc. at the Management Communication Quarterly page: http://mcq.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: < a href="http://online.sagepub.com/">http://online.sagepub.com/

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Date Posted: 12 January 2011

This document has been peer reviewed.