Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

December 1997

Publication Source

American Political Science Review

Volume

91

Issue

4

Start Page

971

Last Page

972

Abstract

The presumed importance of formal education to good citizenship has been deeply imbedded in the theory and practice of democracy in America since the founding. Education provides the skills and knowledge for creating a productive, informed, and engaged citizenry. It is the great equalizer that helps level the economic, social, and political playing field. Survey research since the 1950s has provided consistent evidence of the value of education at the individual level. Indeed, in his 1972 essay, "Change in the American Electorate" (in Angus Campbell and Philip E. Converse, eds., The Human Meaning of Social Change), Philip E. Converse describes education as "the universal solvent," strongly and positively correlated with a host of valued civic attitudes and behaviors.

Copyright/Permission Statement

© Cambridge University Press. This journal can be found online at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSR.

Comments

NOTE: At the time of publication, the author Michael X. Delli Carpini was affiliated with Columbia University. Currently January 2008, he is a faculty member of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Date Posted: 11 January 2008