Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

1-2009

Publication Source

The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

Volume

625

Issue

1

Start Page

196

Last Page

204

DOI

10.1177/0002716209338701

Abstract

The transformation of television has altered the capacity of the state to control the agenda for making war, convening peace, and otherwise exercising its foreign policy options. In the age of the state gatekeeper, there was at least the illusion (and often the reality) that the government could substantially control the flow of images within its borders. With transformations in television systems, national systems of broadcast regulation have declined, replaced by transnational flows of information where local gatekeepers are not so salient. The rise of satellites with regional footprints and the spread of the Internet give governments the ability to reach over the heads of the state and speak directly to populations. Both receiving and sending states will have foreign policies about the meaning of the right to receive and impart information and the extent to which satellite signals can be regulated or channeled.

Copyright/Permission Statement

The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol 625/No 1, 2009, © SAGE Publications, Inc., 2009, by SAGE Publications, Inc. at the The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science page: http://ann.sagepub.com/ on SAGE Journals Online: http://online.sagepub.com/

Keywords

diplomacy, public diplomacy, CNN effect, international broadcasting, free flow of information

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Date Posted: 02 February 2010

This document has been peer reviewed.