Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Review

Date of this Version

1-1-2000

Publication Source

Public Opinion Quarterly

Volume

64

Issue

4

Start Page

546

Last Page

549

DOI

10.1086/318645

Abstract

In his important and provocative book, The Good Citizen, Michael Schudson argues that there have been four distinct eras of American civic life, each characterized by a different model of citizenship. In the first era, roughly corresponding to the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, citizens deferred to the leadership of political elites, and civic responsibility consisted mainly of affirming the legitimacy of this ruling caste. In the second era, in place throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century, citizens played a more central role, though one orchestrated by strong local party organizations that mobilized the masses through patronage, entertainment, and other individual, material rewards rather than through detailed appeals to ideology or issues.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This article appears in Public Opinion Quarterly, available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/318645.

Comments

NOTE: At the time of publication, the author Michael X. Delli Carpini, was affiliated with Columbia University. Currently January 2008, he is a faculty member of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Date Posted: 11 January 2008