Departmental Papers (ASC)

Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

January 1997

Publication Source

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Volume

72

Issue

1

Start Page

119

Last Page

131

DOI

10.1037/0022-3514.72.1.119

Abstract

Coordination in social interaction means that persons adjust their actions to those of their partners. Common methods for measuring coordination include judgments and behavioral covariation. Sixteen 1-min segments of interaction were chosen (8 high and 8 low in behavioral coordination). In Study 1, 51 people judged the 16 segments, rating each for coordination. Study 2 (N = 17) used different items. Study 3 (N = 22) replicated Study 2 without sound and with a mosaic pattern imposed on the faces. Results indicated judges were reliable, able to distinguish high from low coordination interactions on the basis of 1-min slices for male but not female dyads. Segments judged to be coordinated had partners smiling in synchrony but with complementary patterns of gazing and gesturing. Both measures correlated with conversational satisfaction, but only behavioral coordination predicted attraction.

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Date Posted: 02 April 2008

This document has been peer reviewed.