Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

11-28-2012

Publication Source

PLoS One

Volume

7

Issue

11

Start Page

e50269

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0050269

Abstract

Previous studies that pooled Indian populations from a wide variety of geographical locations, have obtained contradictory conclusions about the processes of the establishment of the Varna caste system and its genetic impact on the origins and demographic histories of Indian populations. To further investigate these questions we took advantage that both Y chromosome and caste designation are paternally inherited, and genotyped 1,680 Y chromosomes representing 12 tribal and 19 non-tribal (caste) endogamous populations from the predominantly Dravidian-speaking Tamil Nadu state in the southernmost part of India. Tribes and castes were both characterized by an overwhelming proportion of putatively Indian autochthonous Y-chromosomal haplogroups (H-M69, F-M89, R1a1-M17, L1-M27, R2-M124, and C5-M356; 81% combined) with a shared genetic heritage dating back to the late Pleistocene (10–30 Kya), suggesting that more recent Holocene migrations from western Eurasia contributed

Copyright/Permission Statement

© 2012 ArunKumar et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Comments

The full list of Genographic Consortium members can be found in the Acknowledgements.

Correction: Some of the values in Table 2 were included in the wrong columns. Please see the correct version of Table 2 at the following link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/annotation/8663819b-5ff0-4133-b70a-2d686dfb0a44

Keywords

demography, haplogrous, haplotypes, India, Paleogenetics, phylogenetic analysis, population genetics, Y Chromosomes

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Date Posted: 18 December 2014

This document has been peer reviewed.