Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

3-2010

Publication Source

Anthropology News

Volume

51

Issue

3

Start Page

5

Last Page

8

DOI

10.1111/j.1556-3502.2010.51305.x

Abstract

Imagine a world where one’s right to property (including possession of one’s own body parts) is predicated upon having politically powerful relatives. Those who lack such kin are routinely disinterred and scientifically dismembered after death. When their relatives seek to recover their bodies, they encounter bureaucratic reconstructions of their identities. Who would tolerate such injustices? Now, imagine this scenario within the context of the NAGPRA legislation. NAGPRA procedures were intended to remove Indigenous ancestral remains from museum control and facilitate their repatriation. Yet, thousands of deceased individuals remain separated from their relatives, held captive, in part, by modern notions of association.

Copyright/Permission Statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the article, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1556-3502.2010.51305.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

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Date Posted: 23 December 2016