Document Type

Journal Article

Date of this Version

4-19-2010

Publication Source

Diversity

Volume

2

Issue

4

Start Page

618

Last Page

652

DOI

10.3390/d2040619

Abstract

Although the Neotropics are recognized as a region rich in biological diversity, the origin, evolution, and maintenance of this phenomenon continues to be debated. Historical ecologists and landscape archaeologists point out that the Neotropics have a long, complex human history that may have been a key factor in the creation, shaping, and management of present day biodiversity. The construction of monumental earthworks referred to as ring ditches of the Bolivian Amazon and surrounding regions in late prehistory had considerable impact on the fauna, flora, soils, and topography of forest islands. Patterned landscape features, historical documents, energetics, and historical ecology are used to understand the transformation of forest islands into anthropogenic built environments.

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Date Posted: 02 November 2011

This document has been peer reviewed.